‘The New York Times’ sues Microsoft and OpenAI for using its texts without permission

Estimated read time 2 min read


As part of the lawsuit, examples of various texts produced by GPT-4 (one of OpenAI’s products) are included that are almost indistinguishable from some research published by the medium.

The newspaper The New York Times has filed a lawsuit this Wednesday against Microsoft and the artificial intelligence company OpenAI for using their texts without permission to train their AI models.

“Through Microsoft Bing Chat (recently renamed ‘Copilot’) and Open AI ChatGPTthe defendants seek to take advantage of The Times’ enormous investment in its journalism, using it to build substitute products without permission or payment,” reads the lawsuit, filed in a Manhattan court.

The newspaper is not seeking specific financial compensation, but is seeking to hold the defendants responsible for “billions of dollars” in damagesand that AI models that use ‘copyrighted’ information from The New York Times.

As part of the demand they include examples from various texts produced by GPT-4 (one of OpenAI’s products) that are almost indistinguishable from some research published by the medium.

In addition, they show that Microsoft’s Bing search engine can be asked to copy entire paragraphs of news from the Timeswhich requires a subscription to read much of its content.

Artificial intelligence ‘chatbots’ like ChatGPT use enormous amounts of text data to predict the most likely word in response to a question, thereby managing to recreate with amazing accuracy human speech.

However, in many cases, all those texts that are used to train the model, such as books or press articles, are protected by ‘copyright’, and more and more authors and companies demand to be compensated for the use of their work.

At the beginning of the month, OpenAI, whose main investor is Microsoft, reached an agreement with the company Axel Springer, which publishes the media Political, Business Insider either Bildto use its content in exchange for a fee.



Source link

You May Also Like

More From Author

+ There are no comments

Add yours